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Explain in detail REST

Mumbai University > Information Technology > Sem6 > Advanced Internet Technology

Marks: 5M

Year: Dec 2015

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In computing, representational state transfer (REST) is the software architectural style of the World Wide Web. More precisely, REST is an architectural style consisting of a coordinated set of architectural constraints applied to components, connectors, and data elements, within a distributed hypermedia system. REST ignores the details of component implementation and protocol syntax in order to focus on the roles of components, the constraints upon their interaction with other components, and their interpretation of significant data elements. Through the application of REST architectural constraints certain architectural properties are induced: Performance, Scalability, Simplicity, Modifiability, Visibility, Portability, and Reliability. The term representational state transfer was introduced and defined in 2000 by Roy Fielding in his doctoral dissertation at UC Irvine. REST has been applied to describe desired web arch itecture, tidentify existing problems, to compare alternative solutions and to ensure that protocol extension would not violate the core constraints that make the web successful. Fielding used REST to design HTTP

1.1 and Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI).

To the extent that systems conform to the constraints of REST they can be called RESTful. RESTful systems typically, but not always, communicate over Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) with the same HTTP verbs (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, etc.) that web browsers use to retrieve web pages and to send data to remote servers. REST systems interface with external systems as web resources identified by Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs), for example /people/tom, which can be operated upon using standard verbs such as DELETE /people/tom.

The name "Representational State Transfer" is intended to evoke an image of how a well-designed Web application behaves: a network of web pages (a virtual state-machine), where the user progresses through the application by selecting links (state transitions), resulting in the next page (representing the next state of the application) being transferred to the user and rendered for their use.

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